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SafetyAlerts.com
July  21, 1999

General Motors Corp. Recalls Nearly 3.5 Million Pick Up Trucks, SUV's, and Suburbans

Detroit, MI (SafetyAlerts) General Motors Corp. announced today a recall affecting nearly 3.5 million light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans due to defects with their anti lock brake systems (ABS).

In their talk paper, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said that the recall comes after one of the longest and most costly investigations in the agency's history. 

The following models were investigated by the NHTSA:

1991-1997
Chevrolet Blazer
GMC Jimmy
Oldsmobile Bravada
Chevrolet S-10
GMC Sonoma

Chevrolet Astro Vans
GMC Safaris and G-Vans
Cyclone
Typhoon

1992-1995
Chevrolet and GMC Suburban

Vehicles recalled as a result of this investigation include:

1993-1996
Chevrolet Blazer
GMC Jimmy

1994-1996
Chevrolet S-10
GMC Sonoma

1992-1995
Chevrolet Astro Vans
GMC Safaris

1993-1996
G series vans

Due to the complexity of the ABS systems on these vehicles, the NHTSA said these have been two of the longest-lasting and most resource-intensive defect investigations ever conducted by the agency.

Currently, the NHTSA has on file 10,861 reports of brake problems on the S and T trucks equipped with EBC4 ABS units. These reports refer to 2,111 crashes and 293 injuries. There are 2,400 reports (782 crashes and 68 injuries) of brake problems on the Suburbans equipped with the EBC4 units. The vast majority of these reports have not been confirmed by the agency.

GM will modify the computer program that operates the ABS units at no charge to owners of the vehicles, NHTSA said.

GM also will conduct a service recall (referred to by GM as a special policy") to address another potential problem identified by the NHTSA, and confirmed by GM, during the EA94-03 8 investigation. The NHTSA discovered that certain 1993-1996 GM light trucks equipped with EBC4 ABS units that utilize a "three-sensor" system could experience extended stopping distances during ABS stops on certain multiple transition surfaces; i.e., when the vehicle travels from a pavement surface with a relatively high coefficient of friction, onto a relatively slippery section of pavement, and then returns to the high coefficient pavement while the ABS is still operating.

The other trucks covered by EA94-038, including trucks equipped with four-sensor EBC4 ABS units, trucks equipped with rear-wheel anti-lock, or RWAL, systems, and those newer trucks equipped with EBC3 10 ABS units, did not experience this problem.

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